Archive for August, 2017

Garvan Woodland Gardens

August 3, 2017

We need to plan and make the trip over to Hot Springs to see this beautiful place! This article appeared in the magazine “Local” July/August 2017 issue.

Garvan Woodland Gardens

Buffalo River Trip

August 1, 2017

Visitor center holds history of Buffalo River

A photograph at Buffalo National River’s Tyler Bend Visitor Center shows an extended family who lived near the waterway a century or so ago.

TYLER BEND — The vast majority of the 800,000 or more visitors expected this year along the Buffalo National River are here for the pleasures of the present — swimming, canoeing, kayaking, hiking, fishing, camping and other fun in the sun.

But the human past is also a visible and fascinating presence in one of Arkansas’ most treasured natural resources. Nearly all people living within the preserve’s boundaries were required to move elsewhere when the 94,293-acre federal enclave was established by Congress in 1972.

Some of those rural residents deeply resented having to give up their long-held family land for a greater cause. They were losers in the worthy effort to preserve one of the few remaining rivers that still flows freely in the lower 48 states after a century of damming by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

To get a quick sense of life along the Buffalo in former times, the place to begin is the National Park Service’s Tyler Bend Visitor Center, near the river’s south bank in Searcy County. That can be followed by stops near opposite ends of the park at Rush Historical District and Big Buffalo Valley (aka Boxley Valley) Historic District.

Vintage black-and-white photographs at the visitor center show the rough-hewn circumstances in which pioneering residents lived. National Park Service information notes that from 1880 to 1915, “the remaining public land was entered both by prospective homesteaders and timber companies.

“At times the two came into conflict, as ‘squatter land’ was legally entered by outside interests. The homesteaders of this period in many cases were trying on a wilderness lifestyle for the first time and needed help in even constructing a simple one-room log shelter.

“Most of these homestead entries were located on less desirable land, away from the river valley and main tributaries. However, new road systems and travel made the ridge-top dweller more accessible to the rest of the world than the earlier settlers would have been. In addition, the increase in schools, churches and community centers aided in decreasing the isolation of these later settlers.”

Near the national river’s east end in Marion County, Rush Historic District is said to be the only visible ghost town west of the Mississippi River and east of the Rocky Mountains.

Rather than gold, zinc was the ore that brought transient prosperity to Rush, which was founded in the 1880s and saw its population peak at 5,000 during World War I. That’s when armament needs for the 1914-1918 conflict drove the price of zinc to record highs.

After that, Rush slowly faded away, with the last residents moving away after the post office closed in the 1950s. What makes a visit evocative today is sight of ramshackle structures built in the town’s heyday. Efforts by the National Park Service have countered the decay by time, weather and vandalism.

More idyllic is Big Buffalo Valley Historic District in Newton County, near the national river’s western boundary. Also called Boxley Valley Historic District, it is a likely place to spot elk in roadside meadows soon after sunrise or before sunset. It is also the setting for scattered family farms that were allowed to continue operation under some restrictions after 1972.

When the district was established, a principal reason was that many of the original structures remained untouched by modern development. These include log cabins, barns and spring houses. By squinting just slightly while driving along Arkansas 43, it is possible to imagine that the calendar has been turned back any number of decades. There’s one definite difference: The road is paved.

Buffalo National River’s Tyler Bend Visitor Center, 11 miles northwest of Marshall off U.S. 65, is open 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily. Admission is free. Go to nps.gov/buff or call

(870) 439-2502.

Exercises to avoid bad gait

August 1, 2017

Avoiding Trendelenburg gait (how many older people walk)

Exercise #1: Single-Leg Step-Over

“This exercise is one step removed from walking,” Stare explains. “It makes you more conscious of what you want to do when you walk.”

How to do it: Like the self-test, you want to do this one in front of a mirror. Roll up a small towel, and place it perpendicular to the instep of your right foot. If your feet are shoulder-width apart, the towel basically connects the insteps of both feet. Put your hands on your hips. Lift your left foot, and tap your toes on the floor in front of the towel. Keep your weight entirely on your right leg and your hips level.

Immediately lift your foot again, and tap it on the floor behind the towel. Alternate between tapping in front of and behind the towel for at least 30 seconds, then switch sides and repeat.

Sets, reps, and frequency: “Doing something daily is the best way to learn,” Stare says. If you struggled with the self-test, you can try step-overs multiple times per day. “You can do it once a day or 20 times a day, and it’s not likely to cause any problems. The more you do it, the more you change your habits and improve your motor control.”

Exercise #2: Side Plank

If you work out in a gym, you’ve seen lots of people doing side planks, and if you work out with a trainer, you’ve probably done your share. They’re popular for a reason: They work everything on the side that’s supporting your weight, especially the core muscles in your hips, abs, and lower back. That means they also work the gluteus medius, Stare says.

How to do it: Set up on a mat or towel with your weight resting on your right forearm and the outside edge of your right foot. Set your left foot on top of your right. Lift your body so it forms a straight line from neck to heels. Rest your left hand on your right shoulder, or place it gently on the floor for support. Hold for 30 to 60 seconds, switch sides, and repeat. If you can’t quite do 30 seconds, hold as long as you can.

Sets, reps, and frequency: Do up to three sets of 30 to 60 seconds per side. You can do them every day. If that’s unrealistic, shoot for a minimum of three times per week.

Exercise #3: Single-Leg Squat

It works the whole lower body on the side of the working leg—from the foot to the calf, thigh, and hip—along with the core muscles. The gluteus maximus and medius work especially hard when all your load is on that side of your body, plus you also improve the stability of your ankles and hips.

How to do it: Stand with your back to a chair or bench with your heels a few inches away from it. Cross your arms over your chest, and lift your left leg off the floor. If that’s too difficult, keep your left foot on the floor but shift your weight to your right leg. Tighten everything in your torso, and carefully push your hips back. Lower your body until your glutes touch the chair or bench behind you. Push through your feet to stand back up. That’s one rep. Do four or five reps, switch sides, and repeat.

Sets, reps, and frequency: Aim for three sets of four to five reps per leg. Try it three times per week on nonconsecutive days. If you’re stronger and more ambitious, you can work up to 15 reps per set.

Tip: If you are new to squats or working on mastering the basic squat, you can use a chair for support and to learn good form. Watch this video for a step-by-step demonstration.